News & Events

Over 100 Years of Rabun County Singing Conventions: Seven-Shape Notation, 100-Foot-Long Dinner Tables, and a Courthouse That Talked

Singing conventions with large, enthusiastic crowds were Rabun County’s rock concerts back in the day. Think hymnals instead of the Rolling Stones In reporting on the three-day Rabun County Singing Convention in 1931, the Clayton Tribune wrote, “The attendance on Friday was rather small but on Saturday the crowd had grown almost to the capacity

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Farming in Rabun County: Maize, Subsistence Farms and Moonshine

The earliest white settlers, Scots-Irish from Pennsylvania, Virginia and North Carolina, arrived in northeast Georgia in the late eighteenth century. They farmed the land to survive, but those settlers were not the first to raise crops in the fertile valleys and river bottomlands of what would become Rabun County. Already living in the north Georgia

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When Convicted Murderers Were Hung in Rabun County

 One said he could hear a rattling noise in his head. The other claimed he killed in self-defense.  These two men were the only convicted murderers ever hung in Rabun County.  Both hangings took place in Clayton more than a century ago. The first was held in the privacy of the jail. The second was

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Rabun County in the Civil War: The Story of a House Conflicted

A Rabun County slaveholder who voted against Georgia’s secession from the Union…but then didn’t.  A rebellion against Georgia’s government by disaffected Confederate soldiers and Union sympathizers.  300 Rabun County men who fought for the Confederacy, including one at Appomattox with Robert E. Lee at the surrender in 1865.  These facts would seem to illustrate a

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Rabun County: The First 200 Years

Rabun County turns 200 years old on December 21, 2019.  From its beginnings as a remote and sparsely populated frontier in 1819, the county has developed into a growing magnet for mountain tourists…with a thriving downtown in its county seat…and elegant homes dotting the shores of pristine lakes.  To find out how this transformation happened,

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Life in Early Rabun County

Museum Exhibit Life in Early Rabun County Rabun County’s early settlers in the late 1700s and early 1800s were predominantly Scots-Irish, who brought with them their traditions, music, language and methods of survival. The county was isolated, sparsely populated and poor. Life in the mountains was harsh. Roads, if they existed at all, were treacherous

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